The Mystery of the Dragon Seal

Cards, stamps, Jackie Chan in The Mystery of the Dragon Seal. It is not entirely clear what is wrong with Russian mainstream film producers. Instead of ordering a good script for a talented American screenwriter, let them pay him a tidy sum for it, they give this tidy sum to talented foreign actors, and write the script themselves for free. As a result, the actors have nothing to play, the script falls apart into episodes from the very first frames, and the film goes to the grave in the cemetery of the Next Big Unsuccessful Projects. So it happened with the long-suffering “Secret Dragon Seal”, which really wanted to, but could not.

Here is Jonathan Green (the hero of the original “Wii”; if anything) comes to Emperor Peter I to give him the cards. Some unforeseen circumstances happen to him (we will do without spoilers, otherwise nothing will remain of the film at all). Now he is being sent to China for new cards. For some reason he goes there – his character is devoid of motivation; as much as Russian mass cinema is devoid of good scripts. But what is there, paradoxically; but even the timekeeping of the main character of the film is almost less than that of some secondary (in theory) characters.

For example, with Jackie Chan, the keeper of that very seal, it is, of course, wonderful that he was given more screen time than could be expected, the scene with him is generally the best in the film. But in that case, why deprive the protagonist? So that an already breathing story will lose its one frail plot engine?

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Problem

They tried to solve the problem of loosely connected events by creating a considerable number of heroes. Here you will find a mysterious man in an iron mask (in Hollywood grimacing Kolokolnikov, playing the hero of Dumas’s novels), and the guard of the English Tower, driven by the laws of honor (he was quite vividly portrayed by Schwarzenegger), and the Chinese assistant of the protagonist (well, this, you know, utterly clichĂ©d) .

Well, where without an evil, pretentious witch; who dreams of summoning a dragon in order to command the whole world with the help of it? She behaves like the most typical movie villain in the world: she lets her minions into the expense at the first opportunity, scares the people of China and laughs picturesquely when necessary. Moreover, four magic guards were invented for her, similar to each other, like brothers from a casket.

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